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Jean-Baptiste Regnaul 1795 painting "Freedom and Death"

Jean-Baptiste Regnaul 1795 painting “Freedom and Death”

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paul
paul
1 month ago

Obvious signs to start with, the torch of illumination on the angel’s head who is offering the choice of “liberty” or “death.” “Lady Liberty” is holding in one hand a plumb square (if ever there were a Masonic symbol) and the other holds a peculiar hat of the type that I believe popularized wizard’s hats and is also vaguely phallic (if it were just fabric, why is she grasping it like a phallus?). Over her head is a 6-pointed star, which is linked to the hexagram and I believe to be a symbol of Luciferianism. She rests her foot upon an abbreviated stairway, which represents the steps of enlightenment. Next to the stairway appears to be a fasces that has fallen over. The common people do not matter, and are almost an afterthought to the enlightened. The foundation upon which “Lady Liberty” sits has the snake eating itself, though it’s not in the infinity-symbol style ouroboros we’re often used to, but is in a circle. She is clothed in white (or grey?), but has a black blanket draped over her legs, likely as a dualism symbol.

Death is, well, Death. Just chilling there with his scythe, as usual. Why? Is it to say that the only choices are to be part of the enlightened elite or to die?

Also note the left hand of the angel. I’ve noticed in much Renaissance art that a hand is often depicted with the middle and ring finger together and the index and pinky splayed gently apart. Perhaps it is to symbolize an M for Mason when the hand is downward?

Another interesting point, on each wing, I count 13 feathers (pinions and trailing edge) that have their tips exposed.

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  paul

I’ve looked up the Masonic hand signs, I can’t recall this one. I know the “Dr. Spock” split was a ‘blessing’ by ancient Israelis, I don’t know if that was good or bad based on what we’ve been learning here, but I think anything the Mason’s do is questionable just by being theirs.
I’ll look it up again and see if I find this sign, because I seem to recall seeing the meaning somewhere.

Last edited 1 month ago by lgageharleya
paul
paul
1 month ago
Reply to  lgageharleya

I remember reading a paper that documented the many instances of that hand profile, but the conclusion was inconclusive.

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  paul

Yes, me too and that is all I can find now. But a month or so ago I found pages.

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  lgageharleya

Maybe it’s a more demure, less obvious way of signing Moloch? I can’t post the link without delay and possibly not posting, but there is a WWF wrestler making this sign?

paul
paul
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

Yes, thank you. Naturally, I’m not gonna look up “phallic hat” on my work computer, so that went unresearched

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

So, one layer is Mithras worship. The other is, this is a Roman symbol of a freed slave who was given liberty. Liberty means freedom to read (study, learn) so this is the sign of an early initiate.
And temples, constructed to honor him, called mithraea, were a reflection of the cosmos itself. Often Mithras was depicted in the center, slaying a bull.”
Mithras is who is worshipped on Dec 25.
“Early Christians don’t appear to have had as much affinity for the Phrygian cap as the followers of Mithras did—at least at first.” – no, I’d think not. But it got woven in just like everything else.
It also became a sign of admittance “Pope Constantine (r. 708-715) appears to have worn a type of frigium (the Greek letter phi, from Phrygian was often transliterated into Latin as either as a “ph” or an “f”) in order to enter into the city of Constantinople.” and of scholarship.

“Not long thereafter, in the context of the French Revolution, the freedman’s cap would become the bonnet phrygien or bonnet rouge. It came into vogue in 1789 and 1790 as a symbol of liberty during the French Revolution. The sans-culottes (“those without knee breeches”) regularly donned the cap. It was rumored that Louis XVI was even forced to wear it following the overthrow of the French absolutist monarchy. Freedom from monarchy was the objective of a number of popular coups within the 18th century, but it is notable that other freedom movements also donned the cap” – call this what you like but it was the coordinated ousting of regional lords for those in line with the ‘program’. This was infighting and struggling for ultimate power and the wearers were the believing pawns (because the ones who instigated these uprisings were no better than those they ousted).

” It is said that Belgian cartoonist Pierre Culliford (known as Peyo) had it in mind when creating Papa Smurf in the 1950s. And just a few years ago, sculptor Martin Puryear’s debut exhibition at Matthew Marks in the winter of 2014, attempted to remix and rethink the cap completely.”

They also tie it to MAGA.

Sorry for the long copy/paste, but we none want Paul getting into trouble with HR.

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

So, one layer is Mithras worship. The other is, this is a Roman symbol of a freed slave who was given liberty. Liberty means freedom to read (study, learn) so this is the sign of an early initiate.

“And temples, constructed to honor him, called mithraea, were a reflection of the cosmos itself. Often Mithras was depicted in the center, slaying a bull.”
Mithras is who is worshipped on Dec 25, which is why Santa and his elves wear versions of these.

“Early Christians don’t appear to have had as much affinity for the Phrygian cap as the followers of Mithras did—at least at first.” – no, I’d think not. But it got woven in just like everything else.

It also became a sign of admittance “Pope Constantine (r. 708-715) appears to have worn a type of frigium (the Greek letter phi, from Phrygian was often transliterated into Latin as either as a “ph” or an “f”) in order to enter into the city of Constantinople.” and of scholarship.

“Not long thereafter, in the context of the French Revolution, the freedman’s cap would become the bonnet phrygien or bonnet rouge. It came into vogue in 1789 and 1790 as a symbol of liberty during the French Revolution. The sans-culottes (“those without knee breeches”) regularly donned the cap. It was rumored that Louis XVI was even forced to wear it following the overthrow of the French absolutist monarchy.
Freedom from monarchy was the objective of a number of popular coups within the 18th century, but it is notable that other freedom movements also donned the cap” – call this what you like but it was the coordinated ousting of regional lords for those in line with the ‘program’. This was infighting and struggling for ultimate power and the wearers were the believing pawns (because the ones who instigated these uprisings were no better than those they ousted).

” It is said that Belgian cartoonist Pierre Cuilleford (known as Peyo) had it in mind when creating Papa Smurf in the 1950s. And just a few years ago, sculptor Martin Puryear’s debut exhibition at Matthew Marks in the winter of 2014, attempted to remix and rethink the cap completely.”
They also tie it to MAGA.

Sorry for the long copy/paste, but we none want Paul getting into trouble with HR.

And sorry again, because this may post twice because of unnoticed hyperlinks when I first submitted.

Last edited 1 month ago by lgageharleya
A E
A E
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

Wow. That’s info I never would have found on my own.

A E
A E
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

What is a lictor’s bundle?

PiscesMarie
PiscesMarie
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

stolenhistory.org/articles/lictors-and-roman-fasces-weapons-grand-deception.83/

Found this interesting feel free to repost
(Apologies if this is a repost in the future)

lgageharleya
lgageharleya
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

Okay, thank you. I know about the threefold cords, so this seems similar, but maybe more ominous, since it also reminds of kindling.

PiscesMarie
PiscesMarie
1 month ago
Reply to  deletetheelite
Allonzikoi
Allonzikoi
1 month ago

Just after French Revolution, brought to us by freemasons.