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Human Remains are turned into Diamonds – memorial diamond industry (deathcareindustry.com)

People have always felt a need for self-immortalization. This theme isn’t something new, and evidence of its existence dates all the way back to before the Egyptians. It’s this ingrained desire for self-immortalization that has led to the development of creative burials, memorials, and other cultural practices regarding final disposition of a body. 

Even though the methods of remembering a loved one and the aftercare of a body have changed drastically throughout the years, one thing has remained constant: people have always had a strong desire to be remembered. It’s not just the person who dies that wants to make sure their legacy carries on, but the bereaved friends and family who are left behind that also have a deep yearning to immortalize the memory of the deceased.

Jewelry that is dedicated to the memory of the deceased is a timeless choice for memorials because it can be passed on for generations. Thus, the loved one who passed away can carry on as part of the family for many years to come. 

History of mourning jewelry

Mourning jewelry became popular during the 19th century. Queen Victoria famously started wearing memorial jewelry when she grieved the passing of Prince Albert. The trend took off like wildfire. Aristocrats and wealthy people started wearing necklaces, lockets, rings, and bracelets to pay tribute to their loved ones who passed away. Materials used during the period, that would be later called the “Victorian Era”, included:

  • Pearls
  • Onyx
  • Dark turquoise shell
  • Bog oak
  • Jet
  • Vulcanite 
  • Gutta-percha 

As time passed, so did the types of memorial jewelry and the materials that were used to make it. Around the turn of the 21st century, cremation jewelry took the lead and is giving a facelift to designs of the past. One of the most interesting developments in the jewelry sector has been the development of gems grown from ashes.

What is a memorial diamond?

A memorial diamond is an authentic diamond that is grown in a unique process, in a laboratory setting, by extracting the pure carbon from the ashes of the deceased. These gemstones are also called cremation diamonds. 

Elegant, innovative, and beautiful memorial diamonds have a lot to offer a person who is left broken-hearted after a loved one or a pet has died. However, because ashes are used in the creation process of these diamonds, there are a lot of questions about the ethics surrounding the method. 

What do you think?

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ashleyhanks1986
ashleyhanks1986
1 month ago

Jessie Czebotar talks about this. You can read some on it in Veronica Swift’s novel – An Illuminati Primer.

breaker
breaker
1 month ago

Seeing as though cult members need people’s DNA for certain spells… count me out.

lenseoftruth
lenseoftruth
1 month ago

Having had a deceased family member cremated despite her wishes of being buried, whole. Then relatives were trying to make her into jewelry, I can honestly say, it’s a pretty hideous thing.

john
john
1 month ago

My view is Im going to have a new body when I get resurrected. Our bodies after death will decay. No doubts about it. We can’t take them with us, and cremation, turning to dust, rotting in the grave etc really doesn’t matter. It all ends up destroying the body slow or fast. We really should be preparing for life after death. It starts with accepting the Lord Jesus Christ as Savior.

Fleurdamour
Fleurdamour
1 month ago

Diamonds are made of carbon, and carbon is supposedly one of the keys to the Saturn cube matrix. A lot of our material reality is based on it. Humans and corn have identical carbon in our basic structure, and one of the guises of Satan is the pagan grain gods like Saturn and Dionysus. The diamond mind in Buddhism is another name for the philosopher’s stone in alchemy, an awakened third eye. I would not want to be cooked down into a diamond, it seems like a trap to keep you here in material reality even after death.