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Vogue: November 1944

What do you think?

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Lee
Lee
17 days ago

Even though it is redundant imagery, I do appreciate the recent Vogue posts here. It’s a stark and sad reminder that this propaganda has been circulated by the media for longer than many of us have even been alive.

SomaticBanshee
SomaticBanshee
17 days ago

Yes the occult was huge in the 1930’s and 1940’s, especially among the Hellyweird elites. There was a film director in the 1940’s called Val Lewton (his most well known film was Cat People) and he made a lot of films that dealt with the occult like The 7th Victim which is kind of a prequel to Rosemary’s Baby. His films are so great because they are more psychological horror and he was definitely getting the message across that it was really happening and his films are like warnings to the public. All his characters who deal in the occult always get killed off or punished in one way or another for straying away from God and Goodness. I think that photo was done by Richard Avedon and its been rumoured that his family which were NYC Upper East Side elites had ties to the occult. Avedon himself was deep into mediums and clairvoyance and was obsessed with those two things.

Vievie
Vievie
17 days ago

Is that Grace Kelly? Any idea who the man is?

SomaticBanshee
SomaticBanshee
17 days ago
Reply to  tommyd

Makes sense that the silhouette would be the stand in for the shadow as Freud and Carl Jung psychology was kind of all the rage at that time. If that image was taken by Richard Avedon which I believe it was, he almost always made women look weak in his pictures so if its supposed to come across that their’s always a man pulling the strings behind a woman in the shadows then he’s just perpetuating his dark side by masking it as art photography.

Lee
Lee
16 days ago
Reply to  SomaticBanshee

Excellent insights. Also of note, what we can see of the woman’s face is made up to look pretty, with a hint of innocence or naivety in her smile. Meanwhile, the man looks imposing, mysterious, humorless, and more important in the way he obscures the woman’s face.