in

Don't tell me they haven't been cloning humans…

Don’t tell me they aren’t cloning humans lol

What do you think?

29 Points
Upvote Downvote
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

10 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rosey
Rosey
7 days ago

I love this idea that the Nazis stopped experiments in the 1940s.

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago
Reply to  Rosey

comment image?w=1086

Stephanie
Stephanie
7 days ago

I’ll tell you what i think..I think WTF!?

predatorpatrol
predatorpatrol
6 days ago

There is officially no argument for abortion to exist anymore

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago

They haven’t been cloning humans.

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago

Jakarta
In 1996, a sheep named Dolly was born as clone the world’s first mammal. This discovery makes many people believe that one day there will be more clones of others, especially humans. First, what is cloning?
According to the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), cloning is a process to produce identical genetic copies of a biological entity. In addition, cloning can also be modified so as to produce other individuals who are more ‘perfect’.
After Dolly, many other animals were born as clones, such as cats, deer, and wolves. If a human clone were to be made, what technique would you use?
To make human clones, Live Science said the experiment would most likely use reproductive cloning techniques. This technique will use mature somatic cells or skin cells. The DNA from the skin cells will be placed in the donor egg cells whose DNA has been removed. The egg will then begin to develop in a test tube before being implanted into the uterus of an adult woman.
However, scientists still haven’t found the exact reason for making clone man.
“I don’t think there’s a good reason to make (human) clones,” said Hank Greely, quoted from Live Science.

“Human cloning is a very dramatic act and is one of the topics driving American bioethics,” he added.
The Stanford University professor of law and genetics said ethical concerns around human cloning are many and varied. Potential problems from cloning include psychological, social and physiological risks (basic needs such as security). In addition, cloning can also lead to a very high probability of death.

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago

“Monkey and related experiments are significant largely because they obviously bring us nearer to human cloning,” Michael Shapiro, JD, a law professor and expert on medical ethics at the University of Southern California, told Healthline.
However, that assertion comes with a giant asterisk because the nuances and ethics related to human cloning make the issue significantly more complicated.
With every passing year, the question is less “could we” clone a human than “should we.”
“In a way, it is one step closer, technically, but in a way, it’s not,” Marcy Darnovsky, PhD, executive director of the Center for Genetics and Society, a nonprofit advocacy group, told Healthline.
“Even though there are these two cute baby monkeys, [it] doesn’t really seem like it could count as a significant stepping stone toward human cloning,” she said.

According to Darnovsky, you need only examine the methodology of the experiment that eventually brought ZZ and HH to life to see the dangers of cloning:
Multiple surrogates, hundreds of eggs, numerous pregnancies — most of them failed.
In total, 63 surrogates were used, resulting in nearly 30 pregnancies and four births, of which ZZ and HH were the only ostensibly healthy offspring.
Two other baby monkeys resulting from the procedure died within two days of their birth.
“You couldn’t think about doing that kind of human experimentation,” said Darnovsky.
The debate surrounding cloning is incredibly dense, owing to moral, ethical, even ontological reasoning.
But, leaving the larger philosophical questions behind, there remain numerous health issues posed by human cloning for both the clones themselves and their surrogates.
There are risks associated with egg retrieval, the process of harvesting eggs required for in vitro fertilization, is not without its own lingering ethical questions.
Risks also abound for surrogates, owing simply to the labors of bringing a fetus to term, and, of course, the act of childbirth.

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago

How does one recreate the blast of light that occurs in humans when sperm hits the egg?

Roadside Prophet
Roadside Prophet
6 days ago
Reply to  deletetheelite

I still say no or Kim Kardassian would have taken this route (artificial womb) with her and Ye’s 3rd and 4th children. As opposed to using surrogates.

Kardassian would never pass up that kind of publicity. Just look at her prior two child births and all the publicity she partook in regarding her surgeries and placenta accreta.